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Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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  • #4933
    LisaHorkai
    Participant

    For those clinics that still re-use ET tubes how are you cleaning them? TIA!

    #4936
    VeronicaStamm
    Participant

    I use the long endotrecheal tubes brushes to wash the debri from the inside and cuff with hot water.
    If you have enough tubes, breathing hoses etc, I pile them in a bucket to perform the disinfection.
    250 ml HIBITANE DISINFECTANT ( NOT THE SOAP ) PER GALLON OF WARM WATER. I fill the E- tubes at the bottom of the bucket,
    then the lumen of the breathing tubes and finally the rebreathing bugs so the inside is filled with the solution.
    Let it sit for 20 minutes, rinse and soak 1 hr in warm water with same method as above
    Use the ties of the Endotubes to hang them vertically to drain

    #4937
    DanielHarvey
    Participant

    Hi Lisa,

    ET tubes require more than just cleaning and solutions used should be selected carefully as solution residues can cause tissue necrosis. According to the Spaulding classification, the ET tubes are to be considered as semi-critical and therefore should be cleaned and further reprocessed by high-level disinfection or sterilization preferred. There are many patients that don’t show clinical signs of upper respiratory tract infection and that represents a risk of cross-contamination between patients if the ET tubes are not reprocessed to a level that makes them safe to use on patients. PM me at steriplusconsulting@gmail.com

    #4938
    VeronicaStamm
    Participant

    Hi Daniel,
    Preferably are the autoclavable ones, but many practices do not purchase them due to the high expense.
    Which other solution – other than Hibitane -do you recommend to use ( soaking time and rinsing ) that will not damage the plastic ?
    We use Sheridan for most tubes

    #4939
    DanielHarvey
    Participant

    Hello,

    Rinse them first from visible soil – You need enzymatic solution for cleaning (you need those lipase, amylaze, and protease to break some of the soil) and rinse really well. Let them air dry and then soak them in high-level disinfectant. Most high-level disinfectants (short contact time is usually needed) are also sterilant if you let the items soaked in the solution for a longer period of time (e.g. six hours or more). Once the appropriate contact time is reached, you can rinse them and let them dry before reusing.

    Please note that the plastic cuffs will become very wrinkly with repeated cleaning and that can harm the patients, so keep an eye on those and replace them. The rubber cuffs seem to last longer.

    I hope this helps

    #4940
    VeronicaStamm
    Participant

    Hi Daniel,
    Probably many of us are wanting to know which is the product names of the high level disinfectant you are referring to.
    Thanks

    Veronica

    #4943
    DanielHarvey
    Participant

    Hi, I like the ones with H2O2 base as the chemical breaks down into H2O and O2 which is safer for animals and the environment, High-level disinfectant muse be tested before use to ensure there it has the minimum effective concentration (MEC). Steris has one available in Canada; see the link below.

    https://www.steris.com/healthcare/products/endoscope-reprocessing/high-level-disinfection/

    Cheers

    #4951
    VeronicaStamm
    Participant

    FABULOUS !!!! THANK YOU

    #4952
    DanielHarvey
    Participant

    You are welcome! Let’s keep our patients safe!

    #4958
    LisaHorkai
    Participant

    Thank you for this information!

Viewing 10 posts - 1 through 10 (of 10 total)
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